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HIS5020: Religious change, exchange and counterchange: A long-term historical perspective

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General information | General information | Course requirements | Course requirements | Final assessment | Final assessment | Course objective and content | Course objective and content | Literature 


Person responsible for the course:Ask student@mf.no
Credit points (ECTS):10
Start of studies:Autumn
Language:English
Study programme:Master's degree (2 years) - History of Religions
Master's degree (2 years) - Theology
Department:Department of Theology and History

General information

HIS5020 is a course of both general and religious history with a very large geochronological scope, focusing on religious development and the processes and evolution patterns that underpin it. The course covers the main religious events from the dawn of the Roman Empire to the end of the British Empire and projects them on the background of political history. The course orbits around and aims to emphasise phenomena such as cultural interconnectivity and transmission, conversion, hybridisation, enculturation or fluid group (ethnical, religious, etc.) identities. Several classes make forays into fields, theories or large research themes like post-colonial theory, war ethics or religious war. Most lectures illustrate events, concepts or phenomena through material culture in an attempt to maintain a good balance between theory and materiality, between mentifacts, sociofacts and artefacts.
 
HIS5020 Religious change, exchange and counterchange: A long-term historical perspective is an obligatory course in the Master's programme in History of Religions.
 
Alongside lectures, HIS5020 contains also two types of seminars. Research seminars are meant for training students to read critically, discuss and summarise the course bibliography, while writing seminars and are entirely practical and focus on essay writing techniques.Exemption from the writing seminars can be granted by the course convenor upon application. Research seminars are not subjected to exemption.

Course requirements

In order to receive a final assessment, the student must:
  • Attend at least 75% of the lectures and research seminars that are part of the course.
  • Pass the assessment task given in the research seminars. The task is marked pass or fail.
  • Pass the two assessment tasks given in the writing seminars. Tasks are marked pass or fail.
  • Participate in the evaluation of the course if such evaluation is stipulated in the relevant term.

Final assessment

To gain credit for the course the student must fulfill all the requirements and pass a three-day home exam (2500-3500 words). The course is assessed with grades A-F.

Course objective and content

HIS5020 is a preliminary refresher course aiming at laying the foundations for the comprehension of the historico-religious processes and phenomena at the core of the programme. The course covers the main religious events from the dawn of the Roman Empire to the end of the British Empire and projects them on the background of political history. The course orbits around and aims to underline phenomena such as cultural interconnectivity and fluid religious identities.
 
KNOWLEDGE
The student has:
  • command of the main historical landmarks (event, actors, etc.) of the period under study
  • knowledge of the principal theoretical approaches applied to the themes addressed
SKILLS
The student can:
  • approach events or phenomena in a cross-disciplinary fashion
  • summarise and give overviews of vast historical contexts
  • identify adequate theoretical approaches and analytical methods to particular research topics
  • write an exam paper in accordance with the academic standards introduced in the course.

Literature

To access electronic literature when you are not at MF:
Log in to Oria, or use "External access" in the library's list of databases.

LITERATURE
  • Bentley, J. H. (1996). Cross-cultural interaction and periodization in world history. The American historical review, 101(3), p. 749-770. Library (Compendium).
  • Besserman, L. (1996). The challenge of periodization: Old paradigms and new perspectives. I L. Besserman (Ed.), The challenge of periodization: Old paradigms and new perspectives (p. 3-28). New York: Garland Pub. Library (Compendium)
  • Brekke, T. (2006). Between prudence and heroism: Ethics of war in the hindu tradition. I T. Brekke (Ed.), The ethics of war in Asian civilizations: A comparative perspective (p. 113-144). London: Routledge. Library (Compendium)
  • Cavanaugh, W. T. (2009). The myth of religious violence: Secular ideology and the roots of modern conflict (p. 15-180). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Library
  • Edney, M. H. (2009). The irony of imperial mapping. I J. R. Akerman (Ed.), The Imperial map: Cartography and the mastery of empire (p. 11-46). Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press. Library (Compendium)
  • Elverskog, J. (2010). Buddhism and Islam on the Silk Road (p. 175-226). Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press . Library (Compendium)
  • Escolar, M. (2003). Exploration, cartography and the modernization of state power. I N. Brenner, B. Jessop, M. Jones & G. MacLeod (Ed.), State/space: A reader (p. 29-52). Malden: Blackwell. Library (Compendium)
  • Foltz, R. C. (2010). Religions of the silk road: Premodern patterns of globalization (2. ed.). New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Library
  • Frydenlund, I. (2018). Buddhism and violence: An Oxymoron?: Text and tradition in Buddhist just-war thinking. I L. R. Kurtz (Ed.), The warrior and the pacifist: Competing motifs in Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Routledge. Library (Compendium)
  • Heather, P. J. (2009). Empires and barbarians: The fall of Rome and the birth of Europe (p. 1-35, 577-618). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Library
  • Jacob, C. (2006). The sovereign map: Theoretical approaches in cartography throughout history (p. 11-102). Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press. Library
  • Johnson, J. T. (2014). Just war tradition and the restraint of war: A moral and historical inquiry (xxi-xxxv). Princeton: Princeton University Press. Library (Compendium). Hentet fra bibsys-almaprimo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com
  • Kelsay, J. (2006). Islamic tradition and the justice of war. I T. Brekke (Ed.), The ethics of war in Asian civilizations: A comparative perspective (p. 81-110). London: Routledge. Library (Compendium)
  • Koselleck, R. (2002). The practice of conceptual history: Timing history, spacing concepts (p. 1-19, 84-99, 100-114, 218-235). Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press. Library
  • Koselleck, R. (2004). Futures past: On the semantics of historical time (p. 75-151). New York: Columbia University Press. Library
  • Lefebvre, H. (2009). State, space, world: Selected essays (p. 167-184). Minneapolis, Minn: University of Minnesota Press. Library (Compendium)
  • Lefebvre, H. (2003). Space and the state. I N. Brenner, B. Jessop, M. Jones & G. MacLeod (Ed.), State/space: A reader (p. 84-100). Malden: Blackwell. Library (Compendium)

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